Brutal Skulls

Remember the Loony Tunes episode where Marvin the Martian accidentally turns Bugs Bunny into a Neanderthal rabbit? Classic stuff. That picturesque impression of Neanderthals is deeply ingrained in many of us, except perhaps in the latest generation of youngsters who don’t watch Bugs Bunny. They have been fed a sanitized, less cartoonishly absurd, more politically friendly view of Neanderthal man from evolutionists who wish everyone would forget what they used to say about Neanderthal man. But… let’s not forget.

Lest some of you forget that embarrassing knuckle-dragging ape-man stuff, here is a quick refresher from McCabe’s excellent fake science book Prehistoric Man pg 30 onward:

…earlier than… 10,000 years ago, human beings wandered over the greater part
of Europe… They were below the cultural level of the Australian native. Their beetling
eye-ridges, retreating foreheads, heavy chinless jaws, and protruding teeth, are quite
in accord with their stone implements, and betray a very low level of mental culture.
They had no agriculture, no bows and arrows, no tamed cattle, no pottery, no woven
texture, and probably — as we shall see — no clothing and no articulate speech… From
the earliest remains found, these men are given the name of the Neanderthal race.

The general physical and mental character of this race is now firmly established…
they belonged to an extraordinarily primitive type of man. All controversy as to the
normal human character is now over, and the skeleton is admitted to be that of a man
of the early part of the Old Stone Age. The thigh-bones were very heavy and much curved,
and they and the other bones indicated very powerful muscles and a very moderate height.
The man stood about 5 feet 3 inches, his legs slightly curved, and his limbs and chest of
great power. His large teeth bulged outward, and there was little chin. Two thick bony
ridges stood out far over his eyes, and his forehead was extremely low. The skull might
contain 1,220 cubic centimetres of brain matter, which is much the same as that of an
Australian native. Some writers have represented that this is a fair capacity for a man of
5 feet 3 inches, and greater than that of many Veddahs and Andamanese. The latter,
however, have very slight frames to control, unlike the Neanderthal man. As Huxley said,
the skull was “the most brutal of all human skulls” at the time it was discovered.

The next most important discovery was at Spy, in Belgium… complete skeletons of the
Neanderthal type. One skull is slightly better than the other (which some authorities
attribute to difference of age), but both have the heavy frontal ridges, and the low,
retreating forehead, the powerful chinless jaw, and the bulging teeth of the Diisseldorf
skeleton. The men were evidently adults, but the mental capacity was low, and the great
mass of the brain was thrown behind. The thigh-bones were thick and curved, and they
and the other bones indicated very powerful muscles. We had the same suggestion of a
squat, powerful, stunted savage, with brain and facial features going back toward those
of the ape.

More recently finds of great importance have been made in France and Germany, and the
character of early Paleolithic man may be regarded as fixed… Professor Klaatsch regarded
the remains as the most primitive yet discovered… The familiar early Paleolithic characters
— heavy frontal ridges, retreating forehead, bulging teeth, and retreating chin — were very
strongly developed… The Heidelberg jaw belongs to the earliest part of the Pleistocene…
While the teeth, which are preserved in it, stamp it as distinctly human, the massiveness of
the jaw and complete absence of chin bring it closer to the ape-type than any other. It is
midway in profile between the jaw of the gorilla and that of an Australian native… There is
very strong reason to regard this jaw as intermediate in type, between the Ape-man of Java
and the Neanderthal man, if not entirely on a level with the former.

The most recent find of importance… The skull was extremely thick, and had the Neanderthal
features (eye-ridges, low forehead, absence of chin) very strongly developed… it is… nearer
to the Ape-man than any of the others. Here the pithecoid features have definitely shaded
into the human, but the beetling ridges over the eyes, the low forehead, the chinless jaw,
and protruding teeth, still recall the gorilla or the chimpanzee.

That’s how evolutionists used to sell Neanderthals to the public: as ape-men. Part man, part gorilla, part chimpanzee. A Neanderthal was a “squat, powerful, stunted savage, with brain and facial features going back toward those of the ape.” “The massiveness of the jaw and complete absence of chin bring it closer to the ape-type than any other” “It is midway in profile between the jaw of the gorilla and that of an Australian native” “it is… nearer to the Ape-man than any of the others,” “the beetling ridges over the eyes, the low forehead, the chinless jaw, and protruding teeth, still recall the gorilla or the chimpanzee.”

You know, if you said that, thousands of years ago, gorillas roamed all over Europe, people would say you’re crazy. Perhaps that proposition doesn’t sound ridiculous enough. Tell them that, thousands of years ago, “pithecoid” savages or chinless semi-humans who grunted a lot, were perpetually hunched-over, had nightmarish dentition and “brutally” retreating foreheads, with such powerful musculature as would make Vasily Alexeyev look like a weakling, roamed all over Europe… people would say, right, that sounds reasonable.

On the positive side, without all this ape-man stuff, we would have been deprived of some good cartoon moments.

By the way, how can a skull be “brutal”? Does that even make sense?

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